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Saturday, February 9, 2013

Paris, Je t'aime


I was reminded of this editorial during a re-watch of The September Issue (a documentary must-see for people interested in fashion and the inner-workings of Vogue). Although shot in 2007 by Steven Meisel and evoking the photographs of George Brassai. Like George Brassai, the photographs hearken back to a forgotten era and stolen moments a street photographer might capture--friends gossiping as seen through the window of a cafe. Of course unlike Hungarian Brassai, these photographs feature svelte and effortlessly chic models styled by Grace Coddington. It's easy to see the similarities in a side-by-side display, but one has to wonder if some of the original appeal is missing when everyone looks...so perfect; that shift from stolen moments of street photography to the staged ones we often find on blogs and in magazines today leaves something wanting.

6 comments:

Nancy Wilde said...

Love <3

nancywilde.blogspot.com

Wendy Sice said...

I've always loved the very last pic, but the modelled shots are stunning!

Brittany PC said...

I seriously love that last picture.
I love how you can see their reflections in the mirrors.

Lola Wrenn said...

i agree, i've been stalking many a vintage photo archive in search of shots more like this. there is something to be said about candid, unposed shot. a level of intimacy that is betrayed by costumes and posing models. i love this.

Lola
GYPSI

Bevin Valentine said...

Well..I think the images are lovely, but if you consider the history of Brassai and who he was photographing, I'm torn. It almost seems..I don't want to say offensive, but it sort of sweeps away the actual content of Brassai's images in favor of simply appropriating the visual aesthetic of them. Which, in terms of commercial and fashion photography, isn't necessarily problematic (instead is typical), but for me is slightly uncomfortable. That being said, I do (very much) appreciate the historical reference, as I am always insisting to people that fine art and commercial photography are intertwined.

Bevin
magnoliareverie.blogspot.com

Marianne Krohn said...

I think it's hard to compare both types of pictures. I love the editiorial, it's so beautiful and wonderfully composed. But the original pictures are so full of life and they are real. Both beautiful in their very individual way.

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